Mon. Mar 8th, 2021

Japan Declares a Need for 50,000 OFWs Beginning in 2019 to 2025

The Japanese government has announced that it will have as many as 50,000 workers in various industries. This is in correlation with its policy changes allowing foreign workers to reside, as confirmed by Japanese Ambassador Koji Haneda in his speech at the 44th Philippine Business Conference last Friday. The Japanese government has announced that it will have as many as 50,000 workers in various industries. This is in correlation with its policy changes allowing foreign workers to reside, as confirmed by Japanese Ambassador Koji Haneda in his speech at the 44th Philippine Business Conference last Friday.

The 500,000 OFWs will be part of the 500,000 foreign workers that the policy requires to serve the aging Japanese population. They are anticipated to be employed from 2019 to 2025.

The Philippines has an ample supply of young workers with huge potential, while Japan faces an aging society and a dwindling workforce. The new policy residence status will enable OFWs to work in more industries and stay for 5 years, which includes manual workers.

Haneda said that Overseas Filipino Workers make up 12% of foreign workers in Japan. Approximately 153,600 workers are employed mostly in highly qualified fields such as engineering and university work.

In Japan, OFWs are employed as nurses and carers in connection with the Japan-Philippine Economic Partnership Agreement, which took effect in 2008. Over 2,000 Filipino workers have completed the program and been accepted into the JPEPA program.

Under the policy change, however, 1 in 10 job opportunities will be filled by the Overseas Filipino Worker by the summer of next year.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe revealed the implementation of this new policy at a meeting held on 15 June last year. He stated the urgent need for the Japanese economy to increase the rate of growth of the economy by securing skilled human capital in large numbers to boost productivity and compensate for growing local labor shortages.

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